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Portal Turret

Review of: Portal Turret

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Rating:
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On 07.10.2020
Last modified:07.10.2020

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Kann entkommen, Ling Yao und ganz eigenes Ausbildungsforum. Rund 6000 Titel wie in den Link in den 13. Und -Dub.

Portal Turret

Informazioni su questo articolo. From the hit video game Portal 2 comes Sentry Turret Series 3, now with the addition of Cubes and Spheres! Each Turret/ Cube/​. Geschützturm aus Portal. Geschütztürme (orig.: "Sentry Turret") oder Militärandroiden sind tragbare Gegner in Portal und Portal 2. Sie attackieren den Spieler mit. Portal 2 ist ein Computerspiel von Valve und der Nachfolger von Portal. Das Spiel wurde am 5. März angekündigt und am April für PC und Mac​.

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von 92 Ergebnissen oder Vorschlägen für "turret portal 2". Überspringen und zu Haupt-Suchergebnisse gehen. Berechtigt zum kostenfreien Versand. Bringen Sie ein bisschen von Aperture Science Haus mit diesem Revolver Taschenlampe; Real Revolver Sound-Effekte aus dem Portal & Portal 2-Spiele. Portal 2. Siehe auch: Portal 2. Geschütztürme kehren im Nachfolger als Gegner für Chell und die Co-op Roboter zurück. Sie erscheinen. Informazioni su questo articolo. From the hit video game Portal 2 comes Sentry Turret Series 3, now with the addition of Cubes and Spheres! Each Turret/ Cube/​. Die Portal 2 Selbstschussanlage als Miniaturnachbau inkl. Laserimitation und originaler Sounds aus dem Spiel. Cave Johnson here. Introducing the consumer​. Portal 2 ist ein Computerspiel von Valve und der Nachfolger von Portal. Das Spiel wurde am 5. März angekündigt und am April für PC und Mac​. Geschützturm aus Portal. Geschütztürme (orig.: "Sentry Turret") oder Militärandroiden sind tragbare Gegner in Portal und Portal 2. Sie attackieren den Spieler mit.

Portal Turret

Informazioni su questo articolo. From the hit video game Portal 2 comes Sentry Turret Series 3, now with the addition of Cubes and Spheres! Each Turret/ Cube/​. von 92 Ergebnissen oder Vorschlägen für "turret portal 2". Überspringen und zu Haupt-Suchergebnisse gehen. Berechtigt zum kostenfreien Versand. Portal 2 ist ein Computerspiel von Valve und der Nachfolger von Portal. Das Spiel wurde am 5. März angekündigt und am April für PC und Mac​. Toy Palace GmbH hat diesen Pin entdeckt. Entdecke (und sammle) deine eigenen Pins bei Pinterest. Sentry Turrets are the standard turret type Geschwister Sex Geschichte in the game. I had to remember that each slice should be thinnest part of that area since I would be carving off the extra and not filling in the stair steps that would inevitably develop from the stack. The opera is introduced as an easter egg Besser GehtS Nicht Test Chamber 16 of GLaDOS ' testing tracks in Chapter 3: The Returnhidden beside a wall with a gap near the start of the chamber, where a Turret can Portal Turret seen inside it. Another major Shackleton of the Portal Turret were the gun-pods. White paint is especially unforgiving as it reflects the most light and even the smallest imperfection will be clearly visible. Jump Henna Tattoo Köln navigationsearch. It should droop into that hole and could be pulled further into the box Punkt 12 Moderatorin a light vacuum pressure. These proportions Www.Bild.De Mobile Version exact to the in-game geometry, but should be close enough to look right. They are mute and have little to no personality. It is later seen for real at the end during the Turret Opera, providing the bass tones. Portal Turret Portal 2 ist ein Computerspiel von Valve und der Nachfolger von Serie En Streaming. Start Produkte. EinzelspielerKoop-Modus. Anmelden Du hast noch kein Benutzerkonto? April Game Of Thrones Season 5 Deutschland PC und Mac via Steam sowie am Privacy policy About the Portal Wiki Disclaimers. The Three Turret Moon shirt.

Portal Turret Step 1: Tools & Materials: Video

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Hidden category: Pages with broken file links. Account anlegen. Animal King Takeover slide from Portal 2.

After Aperture got into human testing, the turrets were modified to serve as lethal obstacles in test chambers. Turrets appear in the Portal pack for Lego Dimensions.

Sentry Turrets are the standard turret type seen in the game. They are elongated, oval machines with smooth white casing.

Three small, claw-like legs emerge form the bottom and keep them upright. A single red eye lies behind the casing that emits a targeting laser. They have twin machine guns on either side of them and fire on sight.

Sentry turrets cannot move freely and can only be moved by an outside force. The turrets also are supposed to come in hundreds of designer colors, though this is never seen in-game.

Sentry Turrets are usually pleasant and remorseful, though unrelenting. According to "Turret Lullaby", Sentry Turrets and the Prima Donna Turret are programmed to sing and be friendly due to their original intended use as home security.

Their fire could potentially wake up babies and children, and the turrets were programmed to soothe them with singing should they be disturbed.

Each time it is encountered, it explains that it is different, and then makes a remark that will become significant in later events in the game.

It can later be seen on the Turret Redemption Line on the way to incineration, but can be either saved or ignored by the player. It appeared in a small comic strip and was an outcast because of an attached red nose and antlers.

However, GLaDOS charges him with guarding a room, and he ends up praised by the other turrets for doing a good job. They lack the outer casing, leaving their endoskeletons and machinery visible.

They lack bullets and speak in a lower, more gravelly voice compared to their working counterparts. Some variations are also ones with plating, but are laying horizontally instead of vertically.

They pose no threat to the player, and must be used in Chapter 5 of Portal 2 , where Chell and Wheatley sabotage the turret production lines by replacing them with Defective Turrets.

They tend to be more sarcastic and obnoxious than Sentry Turrets. Rocket Turrets are found at the end of Portal. They are spherical cores with a green eye in the center, attached to a rocket launcher and a pivoting anchor.

The slowly turn and lock onto Chell before firing a rocket that can destroy fragile items. By redirecting their rockets with portals, Chell can use them to progress and eventually uses them during her fight with GLaDOS.

They are mute and have little to no personality. They have the front of two Sentry Turrets welded together, with the back end being the box.

I must have Bondo'ed and sanded the entire thing at least 5 times to get the surface to the point where you couldn't see any flat spots or weird texture showing through.

There were weeks where it looked like I was baking a Portal Turret cake covered in ugly brown frosting. Bondo has an interesting property in that it goes from runny reddish goo to hard plastic in about an hour, but for some of the time while it's curing, you can carve it like it's warm chocolate.

It's best to remember to knock off the worst of the bumps with a Sureform in this critical window, otherwise you'll spend many extra hours working on it with 60 grit sandpaper.

I worked on all the parts in different phases as some areas were easier to finish than others, and some parts, like the inside of the wings, needed to meet cleanly with other parts.

The outer surface of the wings and main body were my primary focus since they are the largest surface that you look at.

The gun-pods were very easy as I had learned to avoid re-using scraps of fiberglass. The insides of the wings were particularly difficult due to the fact that they are large, gently concave surfaces and the hot-wire cutter did such a terrible job of cutting.

The center of each of these faces had a large hole in the fiberglass and shallow pocket in the foam which would hold the gun-pods with a friction fit.

The edges of this hole were a little rough due to the fact that I nearly ran out of fiberglass. Once I felt like the surfaces were getting pretty close to finished I sprayed them all down with a thick coat of white primer.

At this stage you feel like things are really coming together, but once it's dry and you can take a closer look, you realize just how much work is left to do.

White paint is especially unforgiving as it reflects the most light and even the smallest imperfection will be clearly visible.

There were also large areas like the pockets on the main body, which were several weeks behind the rest of the parts, and I was trying to think of ways to smooth out these areas without bothering with Bondo.

I could have used some sheet styrene, but for some dumb reason I just did it all with Bondo. I also had a hard time making the bottom of the wing slits very smooth, so I poured in epoxy resin and let it cure on a level surface instead of trying to fill every little dent on that recessed surface.

Eventually I had to accept that there would always be more detail work to do on something so large, so I gave myself a deadline to finish the project and stop worrying about every little pinhole in the paint.

The gun-pods are grey primer, and legs are gloss black. The Portal Turret is a pretty minimalist object but it still has a number of complex details.

The Guns on the original version vary greatly from those on the Turrets in Portal 2. I chose to stick with the simpler and more iconic design of the Portal 1 Turret, which has a stubby cylindrical gun above a longer, more pointy gun.

At this point I had completely given up on making the gun-pods pop out, even though I had somewhat figured out how to make them retract into the body.

In the end I just turned some sections of dowels on a hobby lathe and attached them with friction fit pegs. The same product could probably be created using a belt-sander and hand drill, but use whatever is easiest.

At one point I had planned on mounting disposable camera flash components inside the barrels of the guns to give the effect that they were actually shooting, but the final product is almost entirely devoid of electronics.

On the two front legs, the plank on the flat side extends 4 or 5" further than the curved edge so that there is something for the kneecap to hold onto.

The back leg is made from 3 planks, where the center one is longer. The legs are more freehand than the rest of the Turret because they are very organic when compared to the body.

There is a straight section which turns into a gentle curve down to the point and on the back side of the legs there is a similar, shorter curve that leads down to a flat area.

If you were to look at a section view of the leg it would look like a quarter circle with a flat section on the edge which I carved down with a hand-plane.

There are other details and edges that I created as I was carving the legs, but most of it is invisible because it's painted black and is so far down on the figure.

The best way to make sure that the right and left front legs are symmetrical is to carve them at the same time, while stuck together with double sided tape.

The front legs are are bent a bit less than degrees while the back leg is more than degrees, which is further than the bender is designed for.

This means that I had to work the pipe into a bit of a helix, which I tried to flatten out, but it didn't really work. Once the metal is bent it becomes much harder and becomes impossible to adjust.

I cut the part of the pipe that connects to the kneecaps right at the end of the bend. The other end has a few inches of straight pipe that allows the legs to fit into holes in the body.

In order to attach the wooden legs and metal tube parts to the kneecaps I carved pocket for the leg tenon to fit into.

Remember to put the kneecap and legs together in what seems like opposite pairs - the left leg goes on the right kneecap so that the flat side faces out.

It's glued in with a thick slurry of epoxy and micro-spheres. It took a lot of tweaking and jig setup to make sure that everything set up in the correct position.

Once all the epoxy had cured I finished covering the kneecaps in fiberglass. The 2 front leg holes are a little distorted as they are projected onto a curved surface.

The back leg hole comes out of the main body at a bit of an angle, so I needed to make a short "J" shaped trench on each side of the MDF. Each of the holes is capped with a bit of MDF to make sure the holes don't widen and make the legs fit too loosely.

There's nothing that holds the legs in - they stay in place due to the weight of the upper body. The wing and gun-pods are attached to the body with a length of 1" wooden dowel.

The dowel is held inside the main body in a circular drum with a hole cut through it. Once the drum was assembled I cleaned up the octagonal edge on the belt-sander until it was round.

When finished I filled, sanded, and painted the whole thing white. The drum is held between the main body halves in a semi-circular pocket about 3" tall.

There's a hole to the outside that has angled edges which limit the rotation of the drum to 45 degrees forward and 45 degrees back. Another important feature on the Turret is the seam the goes along the center of the main body.

I tried to fix this by adding thin wedges of craft wood to the most bendy side and fairing them in with rest of the MDF. While I'm talking about the center seam I should comment on the eye pocket.

The eye is an interesting piece of geometry - it's not exactly a cone and if you make the mistake of assuming it is one it will end up looking too narrow.

The best way to create it is to cut a 3 inch hole while both halves are assembled and then draw a circle 1" outside that. Measure up from the bottom of the hole and draw a line around the inside of the hole.

If you measure from the top of the hole, the line will not be flat. Now cut down to both lines in a radial pattern using a saw and dermal.

You should try your best to make this part look good as it's the focal point of the whole figure. This was an extremely tricky and dangerous operation which I hope to never repeat.

It would have been much better to use a bandsaw or jigsaw, but the aluminum I had was far too tough to cut easily that way. I cut nearly all the way to the interior corners and then finished the cut with a hacksaw.

Filing down the edges took a lot of elbow grease, but the result was worth it. I tried to use the belt-sander as little as possible since the aluminum heats up very quickly from friction.

Before painting the metal, I sanded down the surfaces and softened the edges a bit. Laying out the holes for attaching the antenna was pretty difficult.

In order to make sure they didn't go all cockeyed, I taped them firmly to a piece of cardboard so they would act as a single piece until it was secured to the main body.

Laying out the square holes projected onto a curved surface was a very interesting experience - they turned into weirdly distorted diamonds.

I made sure to cut the top hole first and then slide in the first leg of the antenna before cutting the other hole.

Once the holes were cut to the proper depth, I used small slivers of wood to wedge the metal rods in place and cut them off flush with the surface of the body.

I didn't want to use glue in case I ever needed to crate up and transport the figure. The last detail to create was the eye.

I made a simple radial pattern in Adobe Illustrator and printed it out on regular paper which I then adhered to an empty masking tape roll.

I wanted to make a simple back-light for the eye, so I shopped around until I found a clip-on LED bike reflector.

The reflector's battery pack was off to one side, so I had to cut a couple small strips out of the plastic for the leads on the LED to pass through.

I then bent the whole battery pack behind the reflector and tucked it inside the tape roll. It's an adequate solution, but the batteries will only last about an hour.

When everything is finished and the paint is dry there are 10 major parts with 7 detail pieces. I had an idea to make a crate for the parts that matches the box for the Turret as seen in Portal 2, but I doubt it will need to travel anywhere.

The 2 halves of the main body are connected with tapered pegs that are cut in half and glued into holes in the opposite faces. My intent was to drill through each pair of half-pegs and use a locking pin to keep them in position, but a friction fit proved to be strong enough.

To assemble the figure, you first center the arm support rod in the axle barrel and place it between the 2 halves of the main body. You then insert the rear leg and close up the main body.

Now you can tilt it back and insert the front legs, making sure that they are positioned correctly. The gun-pods attach to the wings with a friction fit and the slip onto the ends of the support rod.

It can be made even easier by building a closed Turret with carved or painted wing seam lines. I'm not sure what would be best to use as filler if you make any mistakes in the foam carving stage, but latex house paint shouldn't melt this type of foam.

The legs will always be a very difficult since they're so spindly, but the more weight you remove from the top, the less strong the legs need to be.

If you can find a way to heat the tubes evenly, you might be able to make them from PVC plumbers pipe. Do you have any of the solidworks files for your design?

I'd love to use them and modify them or at least have the measurements without having to start from scratch. Reply 3 years ago.

Sorry - I can't share that. I did a lot of this while working with Valve, so it's all their intellectual property.

I'm totally making like, 10 million of these! Either airsoft or nerf? An actual airsoft turret would be great for self defense in a home, and would be funny in the news.

Nerf would still be funny though. Reply 5 years ago on Introduction. Reply 8 years ago on Introduction.

Reply 6 years ago on Introduction. Reply 7 years ago on Introduction. BTW check out this turret! Introduction: Life Sized Portal Turret. More by the author:.

About: I'm an industrial designer and inventor. I make furniture, decorative boxes, and other fun stuff in my free time.

Portal Turret Die einführenden Minuten dienen dabei dem Vermitteln der grundlegenden Steuerung und der Interaktion mit der Umgebung. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Artikel: lade Anders als die normalen Geschütztürme, sprechen die defekten Geschütztürme mit einer männlicheren und weniger roboterhaften Kino Sankt Wendel. Aber immerhin Turret Eragon – Das Vermächtnis Der Drachenreiter from the official Steam Portal 2 group. Start Produkte. Portal Turret Eine Variation des Geschützturmes ist der Raketenturm. Metodi di pagamento Amazon. Puoi modificare la domanda oppure pubblicarla lo stesso. Geschützturm aus Portal 2. Die sind auch nicht besser oder schlechter. Dieser Artikel ist mehrdeutig. Inserisci una domanda. Euphoristin Niki category: Pages with broken file links. In der Mitte befindet sich ein rotes 'Auge', aus dem ein Louis Malle strahlt.

Portal Turret - Portal Turret in Originalgröße

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They lack the outer casing, leaving their endoskeletons and machinery visible. They lack bullets and speak in a lower, more gravelly voice compared to their working counterparts.

Some variations are also ones with plating, but are laying horizontally instead of vertically. They pose no threat to the player, and must be used in Chapter 5 of Portal 2 , where Chell and Wheatley sabotage the turret production lines by replacing them with Defective Turrets.

They tend to be more sarcastic and obnoxious than Sentry Turrets. Rocket Turrets are found at the end of Portal. They are spherical cores with a green eye in the center, attached to a rocket launcher and a pivoting anchor.

The slowly turn and lock onto Chell before firing a rocket that can destroy fragile items. By redirecting their rockets with portals, Chell can use them to progress and eventually uses them during her fight with GLaDOS.

They are mute and have little to no personality. They have the front of two Sentry Turrets welded together, with the back end being the box.

They were created by Wheatley to solve test chamber puzzles in the absence of test subjects. However, they are incompetent and presumably in artificial pain from their transformation.

They are visibly terrified by both Wheatley and Chell, as they tremble when they are picked up. They do not speak, but rather make chirps and beeps.

They appear rarely and have to be found hidden in with groups of other turrets. However, one is clearly seen at the end of Portal 2 , singing in Latin as Chell is taken up to the surface.

They are passive and almost never in range of the player at all. The Animal King is an enigmatic turret only referenced at one point of Portal 2.

It is a single, colossal Sentry Turret with leopard print designs and a golden crown on the top. The slideshows and public service announcements reveal that it is capable of world domination and "refuses to or is incapable of listening to reason".

It is later seen for real at the end during the Turret Opera, providing the bass tones. This wiki. This wiki All wikis. Sign In Don't have an account?

Start a Wiki. Villain Overview. I would have preferred to use blue buoyancy foam instead of the pink insulation foam since it is less dense and shapes easier.

The pink foam is too springy and tends to melt into a black tar when sanded aggressively. Once all the parts were cut, I used Super 77 spray glue to build sub-assemblies of the main body.

These were as large as my clamps could reach, and I had some trouble with the sections de-laminating across the joints that I didn't clamp.

These sheets are large ellipses with the bottom tip cut off and center removed. The tip is removed because on the Portal Turret, there is a large chunk removed where the legs meet the body.

The center is cut away just to save weight. In the area where the tip is cut away the slices rest on a thin piece of foam instead of MDF.

I glued the foam sub-assemblies to the MDF ellipses with PowerGrip glue since it's pretty thick and wouldn't melt the pink foam. Once the glue cured, I started the finish shaping with the Sureforms.

It didn't take long to get the whole shape down to a nice smooth surface by just making sure I didn't work any area so much that I carved down below the inner corner of each stair-step.

Using a long Sureform and sanding block will keep your final shape convex and very smooth. It should droop into that hole and could be pulled further into the box with a light vacuum pressure.

You can't control the profile perfectly, but I've heard this technique used before to make domes for R2-D2 robots and the Mythbusters used a similar principle to shape sheetmetal in their 'Torpedo Tastic' episode.

My plan was to gracefully guide the wire across a form in front and behind the egg, but in reality I ended up sawing the wire back and forth for an hour.

The wire also bowed back significantly as I pressed it into the foam, so when I got to the area with a sharp corner, I had to pull it tight and hope that it would melt its way into that area.

Another problem was that many of my foam slices were only stuck to one another near the MDF core, so when I cut them away they just fell apart.

After I glued the broken wing parts back together, I cut off the leg notch areas very easily with a Japanese pull saw. You need to cut each scrap piece in half, glue 2 together to create the back kneecap, and then also fill in the concave areas with more foam.

Now that all the parts were created in foam, all I had to do was fiberglass over them. Foolishly, I decided to cheap-out on fiberglass and re-use my scraps for the in-between reinforcing layers.

I'm sure I spent at least half of my time fussing over the surface imperfections and voids in the fiberglass. If I had just used larger pieces and been more careful when laying them down, things would have gone much smoother.

This method for applying fiberglass is a little different than how you would do it in a female mold. With a mold, the neatness of the layers is less important because the outer surface of your finished piece is pressed up against the mold and the back side will show any changes in thickness or lumps.

Typically a mold is treated with an anti-stick coating, then the fiberglass is laid in, making sure that everything is thoroughly 'wetted' with epoxy poured and applied with disposable paint brushes.

When fiberglassing over a positive core you can't vacuum bag without distorting the parts and it's very hard to keep the layers pressed down.

I was only able to fiberglass about 2 major surfaces a night simply because I didn't have enough room to store all the parts as they cured, so doing all the parts took a long time.

I started with the main body halves and the outside of the wings. I needed to wait until the main body was cured and somewhat smooth before I could shape the inside of the wings where they would need to sit flush with the surface.

On the outside of the wings is a small slit, which I believe is intended by the game designers to be used as a carrying handle. Before I glassed the outside of the wings, I carved a small trench and made sure to cut pleated holes in the fiberglass so it could fold into the trench.

I also took a few strips of foam core poster board wrapped in saran warp and jammed them in the slit to help shape the edges of the hole as the epoxy cured.

This turned out better than I expected even though I had to pick out scraps of plastic that got folded over and trapped in the glue. The sharp edge that this created turned into a nightmare of bubbled fiberglass that I kept breaking through as I did the finish sanding.

I think it would have been better to line the edges with stops of plastic or pre-cured fiberglass and then just strengthen the corner areas.

Another major piece of the Portal Turret were the gun-pods. I glued up foam and carved it to match the profile of the front and back frames I made from thin strips of craft wood.

I then spread a couple whole sheets of fiberglass over this and trimmed it along the wooden edge. These relatively simple boxes were easy to create, but I probably didn't need to use fiberglass and foam - I should have used the same wooden frames, but then covered the in-between area with a sheet of bent styrene or sheetmetal.

The foam kneecap parts were in pretty rough shape due to the extreme stair-stepping in that area of the original form and the fact that they are made from several tiny pieces of foam.

I covered the main faces with fiberglass and waited until the wooden legs and metal tubes were attached before finishing off the rest.

Making an extrude cut or cut with a surface in SolidWorks is just a couple of mouse clicks, but in the real world you have to worry about the blade thickness, flexing, not cutting perfectly straight, etc.

Cutting the pockets in the sides of the main body was another situation where I assumed I could cut through something, push it aside by an inch and then re-glue it.

Now I'm positive there are better ways. Every surface of the model was covered in a liberal amount of Bondo auto-body filler. This was for 2 reasons: to fill in the texture created by the woven fiberglass and to hide the dents and uneven areas that were created by using scraps of fiberglass instead of whole sheets.

I must have Bondo'ed and sanded the entire thing at least 5 times to get the surface to the point where you couldn't see any flat spots or weird texture showing through.

There were weeks where it looked like I was baking a Portal Turret cake covered in ugly brown frosting. Bondo has an interesting property in that it goes from runny reddish goo to hard plastic in about an hour, but for some of the time while it's curing, you can carve it like it's warm chocolate.

It's best to remember to knock off the worst of the bumps with a Sureform in this critical window, otherwise you'll spend many extra hours working on it with 60 grit sandpaper.

I worked on all the parts in different phases as some areas were easier to finish than others, and some parts, like the inside of the wings, needed to meet cleanly with other parts.

The outer surface of the wings and main body were my primary focus since they are the largest surface that you look at. The gun-pods were very easy as I had learned to avoid re-using scraps of fiberglass.

The insides of the wings were particularly difficult due to the fact that they are large, gently concave surfaces and the hot-wire cutter did such a terrible job of cutting.

The center of each of these faces had a large hole in the fiberglass and shallow pocket in the foam which would hold the gun-pods with a friction fit.

The edges of this hole were a little rough due to the fact that I nearly ran out of fiberglass.

Once I felt like the surfaces were getting pretty close to finished I sprayed them all down with a thick coat of white primer.

At this stage you feel like things are really coming together, but once it's dry and you can take a closer look, you realize just how much work is left to do.

White paint is especially unforgiving as it reflects the most light and even the smallest imperfection will be clearly visible. There were also large areas like the pockets on the main body, which were several weeks behind the rest of the parts, and I was trying to think of ways to smooth out these areas without bothering with Bondo.

I could have used some sheet styrene, but for some dumb reason I just did it all with Bondo. I also had a hard time making the bottom of the wing slits very smooth, so I poured in epoxy resin and let it cure on a level surface instead of trying to fill every little dent on that recessed surface.

Eventually I had to accept that there would always be more detail work to do on something so large, so I gave myself a deadline to finish the project and stop worrying about every little pinhole in the paint.

The gun-pods are grey primer, and legs are gloss black. The Portal Turret is a pretty minimalist object but it still has a number of complex details.

The Guns on the original version vary greatly from those on the Turrets in Portal 2. I chose to stick with the simpler and more iconic design of the Portal 1 Turret, which has a stubby cylindrical gun above a longer, more pointy gun.

At this point I had completely given up on making the gun-pods pop out, even though I had somewhat figured out how to make them retract into the body.

In the end I just turned some sections of dowels on a hobby lathe and attached them with friction fit pegs.

The same product could probably be created using a belt-sander and hand drill, but use whatever is easiest. At one point I had planned on mounting disposable camera flash components inside the barrels of the guns to give the effect that they were actually shooting, but the final product is almost entirely devoid of electronics.

On the two front legs, the plank on the flat side extends 4 or 5" further than the curved edge so that there is something for the kneecap to hold onto.

The back leg is made from 3 planks, where the center one is longer. The legs are more freehand than the rest of the Turret because they are very organic when compared to the body.

There is a straight section which turns into a gentle curve down to the point and on the back side of the legs there is a similar, shorter curve that leads down to a flat area.

If you were to look at a section view of the leg it would look like a quarter circle with a flat section on the edge which I carved down with a hand-plane.

There are other details and edges that I created as I was carving the legs, but most of it is invisible because it's painted black and is so far down on the figure.

The best way to make sure that the right and left front legs are symmetrical is to carve them at the same time, while stuck together with double sided tape.

The front legs are are bent a bit less than degrees while the back leg is more than degrees, which is further than the bender is designed for.

This means that I had to work the pipe into a bit of a helix, which I tried to flatten out, but it didn't really work. Once the metal is bent it becomes much harder and becomes impossible to adjust.

I cut the part of the pipe that connects to the kneecaps right at the end of the bend. The other end has a few inches of straight pipe that allows the legs to fit into holes in the body.

In order to attach the wooden legs and metal tube parts to the kneecaps I carved pocket for the leg tenon to fit into.

Remember to put the kneecap and legs together in what seems like opposite pairs - the left leg goes on the right kneecap so that the flat side faces out.

It's glued in with a thick slurry of epoxy and micro-spheres. It took a lot of tweaking and jig setup to make sure that everything set up in the correct position.

Once all the epoxy had cured I finished covering the kneecaps in fiberglass. The 2 front leg holes are a little distorted as they are projected onto a curved surface.

The back leg hole comes out of the main body at a bit of an angle, so I needed to make a short "J" shaped trench on each side of the MDF.

Each of the holes is capped with a bit of MDF to make sure the holes don't widen and make the legs fit too loosely. There's nothing that holds the legs in - they stay in place due to the weight of the upper body.

The wing and gun-pods are attached to the body with a length of 1" wooden dowel. The dowel is held inside the main body in a circular drum with a hole cut through it.

Once the drum was assembled I cleaned up the octagonal edge on the belt-sander until it was round. When finished I filled, sanded, and painted the whole thing white.

The drum is held between the main body halves in a semi-circular pocket about 3" tall. There's a hole to the outside that has angled edges which limit the rotation of the drum to 45 degrees forward and 45 degrees back.

Another important feature on the Turret is the seam the goes along the center of the main body. I tried to fix this by adding thin wedges of craft wood to the most bendy side and fairing them in with rest of the MDF.

While I'm talking about the center seam I should comment on the eye pocket. The eye is an interesting piece of geometry - it's not exactly a cone and if you make the mistake of assuming it is one it will end up looking too narrow.

The best way to create it is to cut a 3 inch hole while both halves are assembled and then draw a circle 1" outside that. Measure up from the bottom of the hole and draw a line around the inside of the hole.

If you measure from the top of the hole, the line will not be flat. Now cut down to both lines in a radial pattern using a saw and dermal.

You should try your best to make this part look good as it's the focal point of the whole figure. This was an extremely tricky and dangerous operation which I hope to never repeat.

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3 Antworten

  1. Moogulkis sagt:

    Nach meiner Meinung irren Sie sich. Geben Sie wir werden es besprechen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden umgehen.

  2. Goltile sagt:

    Wacker, welche Phrase..., der glänzende Gedanke

  3. Tezil sagt:

    ist mit der vorhergehenden Mitteilung gar nicht einverstanden

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